Air Canada Lands In Doghouse For Accidental E-mail Reply

indices slip * Telecoms weigh after government pushes on roaming, TV bundles By Alastair Sharp TORONTO, Oct 17 (Reuters) – Canada’s main stock index moved slightly higher on Thursday as investors seemed unimpressed with the short-term deal reached to avoid a U.S. debt default and bought into gold and its miners on an expected delay to U.S. stimulus reduction. The U.S. Congress on Wednesday approved an 11th-hour deal to end a 16-day partial government shutdown and pull the world’s biggest economy back from the brink of a historic debt default that could have threatened financial calamity. “The reaction to the debt deal was played into the markets yesterday, said Gareth Watson, a vice president for investment management and research at Richardson GMP. “Today is a new day.” The deal funds the government until Jan. 15 and raises the debt ceiling until Feb. 7. Gold miners led the resource-rich index’s gainers, as the price of the precious metal surged 3 percent on a belief that a planned cut in Federal Reserve stimulus may be delayed. “The Canadian market is holding up better than the American exchanges because we are seeing a bright spot in gold prices,” Watson said. Goldcorp Inc surged 4.7 percent to C$25.55 and Kinross Gold added 3.9 percent to C$5.05. Fortuna Silver Mines Inc jumped 10.6 percent to C$3.66 after it increased its estimate of silver reserves in a Mexican mine 22 percent.

1 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Air Canada lands in doghouse for accidental e-mail reply The Associated Press 1:18 p.m. EDT October 14, 2013 Air Canada planes at Montreal’s Pierre Trudeau International Airport on March 23, 2012. (Photo: Ryan Remiorz, AP) Air Canada SHARE 179 CONNECT 62 TWEET 1 COMMENTEMAILMORE MONTREAL Air Canada is in the doghouse over a spokesman’s remarks following the disappearance of a dog who escaped airline staff at a California airport. The company says handlers at San Francisco International Airport took the dog out of his crate on Monday after his flight was delayed and the pet either slipped out of his collar or broke it. Air Canada says the dog, an Italian greyhound named Larry, bolted and was last spotted about 5 miles from the airport. TODAY IN THE SKY: Your bookmark for the day’s most interesting airline stories The local CBS TV station took interest in Larry’s disappearance and says it asked the airline about its procedures after obtaining a statement about the incident. Instead, the station says it accidentally received an email from spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick urging his colleagues to ignore the inquiry and what sounded like a jab at the U.S. government shutdown. “I think I would just ignore, it is local news doing a story on a lost dog. Their entire government is shut down and about to default and this is how the US media spends its time,” the station said the e-mail read. Word quickly spread online, with many voicing their outrage over the company’s response.

EU, Canada set to conclude free-trade deal

“The talks are now well advanced” and the two will meet in Brussels “with the aim of concluding negotiations on an accord that offers both sides major opportunities,” Commission spokesman Olivier Bailly said on Thursday. The two men will then brief the press on their discussions, Bailly said, declining to give details of the accord which remain to be settled. Overnight, Harper said “we will soon complete negotiations” on a free-trade accord which began in 2009, with Barroso tweeting that he hoped to conclude quickly. Many observers see a deal, which has proved difficult to conclude, as a possible template for EU talks with the United States on TTIP, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership which is touted as one of the biggest free-trade accords ever. Brussels and Washington have held a first round of discussions and are committed to making speedy progress but there are a host of differences to settle. According to EU figures, bilateral trade in goods last year was worth 61.7 bn euros ($84.0 billion), with Canada the 11th largest trading partner of the European Union, while the 28-member bloc was its second most important market after the United States. Official sources told AFP earlier the deal would give the European Union increased access for cheese sales, one of the last hurdles. On several previous occasions officials on both sides have said a deal was imminent but deadlines passed and no announcement was forthcoming. Negotiations were begun in 2009 with the expectation they would be concluded by late 2012 but they became deadlocked over a few issues, mainly in agriculture. Canada asked for increased European access for its beef while the EU sought to lower tariffs of up to 300 percent shielding Canada’s dairy industry from imports of European cheeses. A transatlantic deal would give Canadian companies access to 500 million European consumers and eliminate 98 percent of Canadian tariffs on EU goods. Politics & Government ‘If I Could, They Would Already Be in Jail,’ Sheriff Grady Judd said Good Morning America